Sunday, 21 August 2016

golf olympics-medalists crowned from six different nations

STATEMENT FROM THE INTERNATIONAL GOLF FEDERATION
The course that allowed original inhabitants to enjoy golf Peter Dawson, President of the International Golf Federation, said: "We are delighted by the strong showing of golf during the Olympics. We were always confident that we would deliver high-quality men's and women's competitions and we have witnessed that over the last two weeks. "Golf's success has been endorsed by strong viewing figures throughout the world and genuine interest from enthusiastic crowds in Rio. To see medalists crowned from six different nations is hugely gratifying. "It is very important that we continue to be a supportive, contributing member of the Olympic family. We believe the values of our sport complement those of the Olympic movement and I am both hopeful and confident that we will continue to play our part beyond 2020." About the International Golf Federation The IGF was founded in 1958 to encourage the international development of the game and to employ golf as a vehicle to foster friendship and sportsmanship. The IGF is comprised of 146 National Federation Members in 141 countries and 22 Professional Members. The IGF serves as the International Olympic Committee’s recognised International Federation for golf.

Who said Rio was not ready !Rio's Olympic Golf Course by Damaur golf

story in images not Only course is ready for players but Natura ecosystem remains unchanged to with friendly Alligators,CAPYBARAS roaming the course and much more
The Olympic Golf Course-rio

Saturday, 20 August 2016

Lydia Ko s first hole-in-one of her life @ Rio-Olympics

19 August 2016, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: World No. 1 Lydia Ko chose the perfect moment to register the first hole-in-one of her life today – and that sweetest of seven-iron shots could potentially lead her to the promised land of Olympic glory in Rio de Janeiro. Standing in her way is the indomitable figure of the Republic of Korea’s Inbee Park, the most decorated major champion in the field, who held firm in blustery conditions to move two strokes clear in the race to capture the first women’s Olympic gold since 1900. With the prospect of the winds increasing in intensity – and the possibility of thunderstorms tomorrow afternoon – the final round will now be played off the first and tenth tees at 07.00 with the leaders teeing off at 08.44 in order to avoid disruption to a potentially thrilling climax. Meanwhile Ko, the 19-year-old New Zealander who has taken the golfing world by storm in three trophy-laden years as a professional, defied gusty, swirling winds at Reserva de Marapendi Golf Course to blaze a trail through the elite women’s field and into serious medal contention. At the end of a challenging day, which witnessed several changes at the top of a powerful leaderboard, Ko found herself in a tie for second place after a third round of 65 which featured a dazzling outward nine holes of 29 – and the thrill of that ace from 140 yards. Park, a seven-time major winner, added a third round 70 for a total of 202 to double her overnight lead to two shots while Ko’s 54-hole total of 204, nine under par, send her hurtling from 21st to second place alongside Gerina Piller. The American dropped a shot at the 18th but managed to sign for a three-under-par 68 and total of 204 while China’s Shanshan Feng matched that 68 to close in on the leading pack on 205. The capricious nature of the afternoon gusts damaged a number of medal prospects, with Piller’s compatriot, Stacy Lewis, shooting a 76 to slip back from second place into a tie for eighth. Brooke Henderson of Canada, who won the Women’s PGA Championship earlier this season, was only one shot better while Charley Hull’s attempt to emulate Justin Rose’s men’s gold medal for Great Britain also suffered a setback as she took 74. The timing of Ko’s first hole-in-one could not be more propitious, with the women’s Olympic competition reaching a thrilling climax. The two Olympic events have now witnessed four aces, with two in the men’s contest and two in one day for the women, with Ko matching the feat of China’s Xi Yu Lin earlier in the same day. The Kiwi said: “This is the first one in a practice round and tournaments, all included. I almost didn't know how to react, because it is your first one, and the wind is blowing and I haven't had the best of luck when it comes to hole‑in‑ones. I would have loved to like done a dance or jumped up‑and‑down, but in that situation, I think I was almost trying to cry, and then realised I had 11 more holes to play. “It's really cool. It just puts the cherry on top. This week is about having fun and this experience, being an Olympian and competing in the Olympics, and to have my first hole-in-one, is something that I'll never forget.” The medal chase promises to be exciting with Park, Ko and Piller at the head of affairs, and the experienced Korean admitted: It was very challenging (in the) conditions. I feel like I really struggled out there. My putting was really, really good today, six birdies out in those conditions is phenomenal. I’m very happy with where I'm positioned right now. “ In spite of the uncertainty over her fitness due to a long-term thumb injury, Park has belief in her ability to strike gold. She added: “Somewhere in my heart, after I made the decision to play this week, I really believed in myself that I can do it. If I didn't have a trust in myself, I wouldn't be playing this week.” Feng, who moved into podium contention, confirmed that the wind had caused considerable difficulties. She explained: “The wind stayed in the same direction but it was kind of gusty at some points. It was hard out there, because even for me – and I'm not a short hitter - I used 3‑wood into the greens on three par 4s, and that's not very normal. It was really tough. You just need to stay patient the whole day, and I think I did.” Hull still believes she is playing well enough to win. She said: “I scrambled quite well. I'm happy with the position that I'm in. And I'm only in tied fifth position and that's nothing going into tomorrow. Anything can happen on a Sunday in a major – or in this case, the Olympics.” Ariya Jutanugarn of Thailand, the most recent major champion in women’s golf, was forced to retire after 13 holes due to a knee injury. Quotes of the Day – Round 3 Inbee Park 202 (66, 66, 70): “I think having big names on the leaderboard can make everything a lot more exciting and that can help women's golf grow a lot bigger. I'm very happy what we are showing in the Olympic golf right now. It's really exciting for everyone. Really exciting for me. Really exciting for all the other players that are competing. Exciting for all the people who are watching. Yeah, it's a great scenario.” Lydia Ko 204 (69, 70, 65): “This week has been great. Even without considering today, I think just this experience, being here, representing New Zealand, seeing some of the other athletes from New Zealand, I think that is an inspiration, and I think that's what the Olympics is about. Obviously the results and the medals are great, but at the end of the day, it's about the world's best athletes together and having a great time and at the end, having to compete to stand on the podium.” Gerina Piller 204 (69, 67, 68): “I would say it's one of the biggest (rounds of her life), yes. Playing the Solheim Cup is definitely dear to my heart and trying to win that for the country. But I've never played in the final round of an Olympics before competing for a medal. It's going to be pretty special. I'm going to soak it in all in, take it all in, and no matter what the outcome, I'm proud to be American.” Shanshan Feng 205 (70, 67. 68): “Back in China, normally we are only on golf channels, but this time people can see us on any (television) channels. I think that's a great chance to let the Chinese know how good the Chinese players are, and hopefully they can just fall in love with the sport and join this sport.” Paula Reto 209 (74, 67, 68): “It (Olympic Games) feels awesome. It's almost like you've got something above some people. Just the experience, it's something you can't buy. It's something you have to earn. We love the golf course. It’s great. For us to play for the first time in a competition since it's been built - that's awesome.” Ariya Jutanugarn (WD due to knee injury): “Yeah, very disappointed, because it's the Olympics, and I told my caddie that I want to finish like four days. I don't care how many over I'm going to be, but I'm thinking about my career.” To find a full list of player transcripts from the Olympic Games golf competition, visit: http://www.asapsports.com Social media For up-to-the-minute information on Olympic Golf and regular updates, please follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and YouTube

olympics golf-Asian ladies dominate even Olympics- what the secret???

olympics golf-Asian ladies dominate even Olympics- what the secret???more---------------------------------- INBEE,&SHANSHAN&KO 20 August 2016, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Inbee Park of the Republic of Korea captured Asia’s first Olympic golf gold medal when she completed a remarkable recovery from injury to underline her status as one of the modern greats of the women’s game. The 28-year-old from Seoul recorded her third sublime 66 at Reserva de Marapendi Golf Course in Rio de Janeiro to win the first women’s competition since 1900 by five shots from New Zealand’s Lydia Ko and by six from Shanshan Feng of China. Park finished on a 16-under-par total of 268 with scores of 66-66-70-66. Park turned the final day in front of a sell-out crowd into a stunning exhibition of brilliantly controlled golf, extending her lead from two strokes overnight into a commanding five-shot victory over world No.1 Ko, who rolled in a seven-foot birdie putt on the 72nd hole for a 69 and 273 total to claim the silver medal. Feng matched Ko’s closing score to take the bronze on 274. Just for good measure, Russia’s Maria Verchenova smashed the course record by firing a nine-under-par 62, assisted by a hole-in-one at the fourth, to climb 25 places into a tie for 18th at the conclusion of a highly successful return to the Olympic Games for women’s golf. As a result of today’s outcome, it means that all six medals awarded in the two golf competitions have been distributed among six different nations – Korea, New Zealand and China in the women’s competition and Great Britain (Justin Rose), Sweden (Henrik Stenson) and the United States (Matt Kuchar) in last week’s men’s contest. The new Olympic champion hugged her equally emotional three Korean team-mates after holing out for a regulation par five at the 18th hole and said: “This is definitely one of the special moments in my golfing career and in my whole life. It feels great. Obviously representing your country and winning the gold is so special. It's just really all I've wanted.” Park’s triumph was all the more extraordinary for the fact that she has only played once competitively since June, the result of an on-going problem with her left thumb which curtailed her 2016 appearances to just 10 starts on the LPGA Tour. However, with seven majors in her locker, there was no disputing her supreme talent, and Park delivered a masterclass in precision golf, accruing seven birdies – offset by two back-nine bogeys – in holding the opposition at arm’s length all day. She added: “This is something I've really been dreaming of coming into the week. There were so many Korean people out here supporting me and it almost felt like we were in Korea. Seeing how much support I had this week, I’m just happy that I finished well. This is definitely a big relief.” Kiwi Ko,-YET A ANOTHER -KOREAN still only a teenager and surely set to compete in Tokyo in four years’ time, fought hard to close the gap on the Korean, but ultimately Park’s advantage was seldom under threat. She commented: “I didn't have a great start, but I just tried to hang in there. I can't believe I'm holding a medal on the podium - it's what I've been dreaming about since 2009. To actually be there beside Inbee and Shanshan, is a dream come true. This has been just an amazing week.” Ko knew that she had to get up and down from greenside to avoid a play-off for silver and bronze with Feng, and did so brilliantly. She laughed: “My celebration was as if I won the gold! It’s pretty cool.” Quotes of the Day – Round 4 Inbee Park 268 (66, 66, 70, 66) On how she rates becoming Olympic champion: “I think definitely at the top because you know, this is something I've never done before. I've won majors, but I haven't won a gold medal, so this feels definitely very, very special and nothing I want to change. It's a special week and special feeling, and I'm so honoured to represent my country. Being able to receive the gold medal on the golf course was an unforgettable moment.” Lydia Ko 273 (69, 70, 65, 69): Lydia Ko On other New Zealand athletes coming out to support her Sunday: “That was one of the greatest things that I was really excited about this week was that I was able to meet other New Zealand athletes and see some that I had met before like Eric (Murray, gold medal rower). We've done a sponsor thing before. And to see him out here and come out and support me, I think has been amazing. That's been one of the greatest memories of this week is to see the other New Zealand athletes, see the New Zealand flag out there and them waving and shouting and supporting. It's been amazing.” Shanshan Feng 274 (70, 67, 68, 69): “Well, of course, China is a very strong country in the Olympics, and we've made so many gold, silver, bronze medals. So my bronze medal maybe doesn't mean that much for the whole number, but to myself it means a lot, because this is golf back in the Olympics after over a hundred years, and I believe it's the first time that a Chinese athlete is competing in this event.” Charley Hull 276 (68, 66, 74, 68): “My first Olympics was a fantastic experience and I got a good buzz off it. I thought it was great. I felt happy with my performance but it’s a shame I couldn't come away with a medal.” Gerina Piller 278 (69, 67, 68, 74): “The crowds were awesome today. I didn't know what to expect. There are a lot of people that come to the Olympics that don't really know much about golf. It was pretty impressive that all the people came out.” Maria Verchenova 280 (75, 70, 73, 62): “I think the whole thing is just me being here and playing here, it means a lot, because that's going to push Russian golf forward, and that's what we need, because Russian golf is kind of steady now; it needs to be pushed forward.” Lexi Thompson 281 (68, 71, 76, 66): “I've had more messages and more texts from people that don't really watch golf. My parents have gotten messages from people that they haven't heard from in years, and they are watching golf just because it's part of the Olympics. I hope this made a mark for us, and hopefully, we'll be in the Olympics for years to come.” Leona Maguire 282 (74, 65, 74, 69): “It's been a fantastic week. Obviously going to some of the sport events at the start of the week was great. Got to see Michael Phelps’ last race and then being able to be in the first group here is something I'll never forget on the first morning. And obviously this has been streamed all around the world, so I think it's great for ladies golf in general.” Aditi Ashok 291 (68, 68, 79, 76): “My Facebook page and Twitter has been going off quite a lot. I'm happy that a lot of people who didn't really watch golf are watching golf now (in India). It's only going to get better from here.” Miriam Nagl 298 (79, 77, 72, 70): “I think it's obviously making a huge difference that the Brazilians are coming out and supporting as much as they did this week and last week. I hope it's going to make a difference. I think it's a big step to make it big in Brazil.” Victoria Lovelady 300 (79, 75, 76, 70): “The whole experience was amazing - arriving here, going to the Village, going to the Opening Ceremony, seeing my dad in the Opening Ceremony by coincidence, crying with him, singing the anthem, walking through the village with all the athletes, seeing Bolt, taking a selfie with Bolt, seeing Nadal. Everything was amazing.”

olympics golf-Asian ladies dominate even Olympics- what the secret???

INBEE,&SHANSHAN&KO 20 August 2016, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Inbee Park of the Republic of Korea captured Asia’s first Olympic golf gold medal when she completed a remarkable recovery from injury to underline her status as one of the modern greats of the women’s game. The 28-year-old from Seoul recorded her third sublime 66 at Reserva de Marapendi Golf Course in Rio de Janeiro to win the first women’s competition since 1900 by five shots from New Zealand’s Lydia Ko and by six from Shanshan Feng of China. Park finished on a 16-under-par total of 268 with scores of 66-66-70-66. Park turned the final day in front of a sell-out crowd into a stunning exhibition of brilliantly controlled golf, extending her lead from two strokes overnight into a commanding five-shot victory over world No.1 Ko, who rolled in a seven-foot birdie putt on the 72nd hole for a 69 and 273 total to claim the silver medal. Feng matched Ko’s closing score to take the bronze on 274. Just for good measure, Russia’s Maria Verchenova smashed the course record by firing a nine-under-par 62, assisted by a hole-in-one at the fourth, to climb 25 places into a tie for 18th at the conclusion of a highly successful return to the Olympic Games for women’s golf. As a result of today’s outcome, it means that all six medals awarded in the two golf competitions have been distributed among six different nations – Korea, New Zealand and China in the women’s competition and Great Britain (Justin Rose), Sweden (Henrik Stenson) and the United States (Matt Kuchar) in last week’s men’s contest. The new Olympic champion hugged her equally emotional three Korean team-mates after holing out for a regulation par five at the 18th hole and said: “This is definitely one of the special moments in my golfing career and in my whole life. It feels great. Obviously representing your country and winning the gold is so special. It's just really all I've wanted.” Park’s triumph was all the more extraordinary for the fact that she has only played once competitively since June, the result of an on-going problem with her left thumb which curtailed her 2016 appearances to just 10 starts on the LPGA Tour. However, with seven majors in her locker, there was no disputing her supreme talent, and Park delivered a masterclass in precision golf, accruing seven birdies – offset by two back-nine bogeys – in holding the opposition at arm’s length all day. She added: “This is something I've really been dreaming of coming into the week. There were so many Korean people out here supporting me and it almost felt like we were in Korea. Seeing how much support I had this week, I’m just happy that I finished well. This is definitely a big relief.” Kiwi Ko,-YET A ANOTHER -KOREAN still only a teenager and surely set to compete in Tokyo in four years’ time, fought hard to close the gap on the Korean, but ultimately Park’s advantage was seldom under threat. She commented: “I didn't have a great start, but I just tried to hang in there. I can't believe I'm holding a medal on the podium - it's what I've been dreaming about since 2009. To actually be there beside Inbee and Shanshan, is a dream come true. This has been just an amazing week.” Ko knew that she had to get up and down from greenside to avoid a play-off for silver and bronze with Feng, and did so brilliantly. She laughed: “My celebration was as if I won the gold! It’s pretty cool.” Quotes of the Day – Round 4 Inbee Park 268 (66, 66, 70, 66) On how she rates becoming Olympic champion: “I think definitely at the top because you know, this is something I've never done before. I've won majors, but I haven't won a gold medal, so this feels definitely very, very special and nothing I want to change. It's a special week and special feeling, and I'm so honoured to represent my country. Being able to receive the gold medal on the golf course was an unforgettable moment.” Lydia Ko 273 (69, 70, 65, 69): Lydia Ko On other New Zealand athletes coming out to support her Sunday: “That was one of the greatest things that I was really excited about this week was that I was able to meet other New Zealand athletes and see some that I had met before like Eric (Murray, gold medal rower). We've done a sponsor thing before. And to see him out here and come out and support me, I think has been amazing. That's been one of the greatest memories of this week is to see the other New Zealand athletes, see the New Zealand flag out there and them waving and shouting and supporting. It's been amazing.” Shanshan Feng 274 (70, 67, 68, 69): “Well, of course, China is a very strong country in the Olympics, and we've made so many gold, silver, bronze medals. So my bronze medal maybe doesn't mean that much for the whole number, but to myself it means a lot, because this is golf back in the Olympics after over a hundred years, and I believe it's the first time that a Chinese athlete is competing in this event.” Charley Hull 276 (68, 66, 74, 68): “My first Olympics was a fantastic experience and I got a good buzz off it. I thought it was great. I felt happy with my performance but it’s a shame I couldn't come away with a medal.” Gerina Piller 278 (69, 67, 68, 74): “The crowds were awesome today. I didn't know what to expect. There are a lot of people that come to the Olympics that don't really know much about golf. It was pretty impressive that all the people came out.” Maria Verchenova 280 (75, 70, 73, 62): “I think the whole thing is just me being here and playing here, it means a lot, because that's going to push Russian golf forward, and that's what we need, because Russian golf is kind of steady now; it needs to be pushed forward.” Lexi Thompson 281 (68, 71, 76, 66): “I've had more messages and more texts from people that don't really watch golf. My parents have gotten messages from people that they haven't heard from in years, and they are watching golf just because it's part of the Olympics. I hope this made a mark for us, and hopefully, we'll be in the Olympics for years to come.” Leona Maguire 282 (74, 65, 74, 69): “It's been a fantastic week. Obviously going to some of the sport events at the start of the week was great. Got to see Michael Phelps’ last race and then being able to be in the first group here is something I'll never forget on the first morning. And obviously this has been streamed all around the world, so I think it's great for ladies golf in general.” Aditi Ashok 291 (68, 68, 79, 76): “My Facebook page and Twitter has been going off quite a lot. I'm happy that a lot of people who didn't really watch golf are watching golf now (in India). It's only going to get better from here.” Miriam Nagl 298 (79, 77, 72, 70): “I think it's obviously making a huge difference that the Brazilians are coming out and supporting as much as they did this week and last week. I hope it's going to make a difference. I think it's a big step to make it big in Brazil.” Victoria Lovelady 300 (79, 75, 76, 70): “The whole experience was amazing - arriving here, going to the Village, going to the Opening Ceremony, seeing my dad in the Opening Ceremony by coincidence, crying with him, singing the anthem, walking through the village with all the athletes, seeing Bolt, taking a selfie with Bolt, seeing Nadal. Everything was amazing.”

Monday, 15 August 2016

2016 Olympic Gold to Justin Ross

Gold Justin Rose Great Britain 201 Silver Henrik Stenson Sweden 202 3 Marcus Fraser Australia 204 4 Bubba Watson United States 207 4 Emiliano Grillo Argentina 207 4 David Lingmerth Sweden 207 7 Mikko Ilonen Finland 208 7 Grégory Bourdy France 208 Bronze Matt Kuchar United States 208 7 Pádraig Harrington Ireland 208 7 Rafael Cabrera-Bello Spain 208 12 Kiradech Aphibarnrat Thailand 209 12 Pan Cheng-tsung Chinese Taipei 209 14 An Byeong Hun South Korea 210 14 Rickie Fowler United States 210 14 Nicolas Colsaerts Belgium 210 14 Fabián Gómez Argentina 210 14 Danny Willett Great Britain 210 14 Thomas Pieters Belgium 210 14 Bernd Wiesberger Austria 210 14 Rodolfo Cazaubón Mexico 210 22 Graham DeLaet Canada 211 22 Søren Kjeldsen Denmark 211 22 Shiv Chawrasia India 211 22 Sergio García Spain 211 26 Yuta Ikeda Japan 212 26 Thongchai Jaidee Thailand 212 26 Fabrizio Zanotti Paraguay 212 26 Thorbjørn Olesen Denmark 212 26 Alex Čejka Germany 212 26 Joost Luiten Netherlands 212 26 Séamus Power Ireland 212 33 Martin Kaymer Germany 213 33 Danny Lee New Zealand 213 33 Matteo Manassero Italy 213 36 Scott Hend Australia 214 36 Patrick Reed United States 214 36 Li Haotong China 214 39 Jaco van Zyl South Africa 215 39 Wu Ashun China 215 39 Nino Bertasio Italy 215 42 Roope Kakko Finland 216 42 Adilson da Silva Brazil 216 44 Ricardo Gouveia Portugal 217 44 David Hearn Canada 217 44 Espen Kofstad Norway 217 44 José-Filipe Lima Portugal 217 44 Felipe Aguilar Chile 217 44 Ryan Fox New Zealand 217 50 Brandon Stone South Africa 218 51 Danny Chia Malaysia 219 51 Gavin Green Malaysia 219 51 Wang Jeung-hun South Korea 219 51 Jhonattan Vegas Venezuela 219 55 Siddikur Rahman Bangladesh 220 56 Miguel Tabuena Philippines 221 57 Julien Quesne France 222 57 Anirban Lahiri India 222 59 Shingo Katayama Japan 226 Lin Wen-tang Chinese Taipei

Sunday, 14 August 2016

ROSE STRIKES GOLD ON HISTORIC DAY FOR GOLF-DAMARU GOLF


ROSE STRIKES GOLD ON HISTORIC DAY FOR GOLF-DAMARU GOLF

Justin Rose -Only a medal but a mountain of joy-pride-honor-
Stenson, who knew he needed to hole a 25-footer of his own to force a play-off, three-putted and the first Olympic golf competition since 1904 had a new champion.


ROSE STRIKES GOLD ON HISTORIC DAY FOR GOLF

14 August 2016, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil:  It took 112 years for golf to find a new Olympic champion, but it was well worth the wait.  Great Britain’s Justin Rose followed in the footsteps of the long-departed George Lyon of Canada when he climbed onto the podium to collect the Olympic gold medal in Rio de Janeiro.
On a sun-drenched final day, in front of a sell-out crowd of 12,000 at Reserva de Marapendi Golf Course, Rose added the Olympic crown to his 2013 US Open title after a prolonged and exciting battle down the stretch with Sweden’s Henrik Stenson.
In the end, the packed grandstand which turned the 18th arena into a noisy sporting amphitheatre, watched spellbound as Rose got up-and-down from the side of the green for the birdie which sealed a worthy gold medal performance.
Stenson, who knew he needed to hole a 25-footer of his own to force a play-off, three-putted and the first Olympic golf competition since 1904 had a new champion.
Stenson, who emerged on top after a similarly epic shoot-out with Phil Mickelson in The Open at Royal Troon last night, had to accept second place this time and the silver medal was a deserving reward for his part in a wonderful spectacle which saw Matt Kuchar of the United States claim the bronze medal after a course record-equalling last round of 63.
Rose finished with four rounds in the sixties and his closing 67 secured the gold medal with a 16-under-par total of 268. Stenson took silver with a fourth-round 68 for 270 and Kuchar’s swashbuckling last day brought home the remaining medal on 271.
The leading three players completed the 72-hole test detached from the rest of the field, in which Belgium’s Thomas Pieters finished a highly creditable fourth after slicing 12 shots off his third-round 77 with a final day 65.
After holing out for a birdie four on the 18th, Rose punched the air in celebration and fell into the arms of his wife, Kate, before savouring the medal ceremony as the Olympic golf champion.
“Olympic gold medalist - It sounds absolutely incredible,” said the 36-year-old.  “I was on that last green, just sort of pinching myself and taking myself back to the quote that I had given about the Olympics all along – that I hoped my resumé one day read: ‘multiple major champion and Olympic gold medalist’ and if that happened then I'd be a very, very happy man.  I pretty much just need the multiple major now, but for the most part, I'm there on that quote.
“The whole week, I've been so focused, really, to be honest with you.  I've been so into it.  I've been so up for it.  I've been just so determined, I suppose, to represent Team GB as best as I could, and it was just the most magical week, it really was.”
The final round in Rio delivered the anticipated head-to-head between two outstanding major champions. And both men held a narrow lead at different times as they exchanged birdies.
It seemed that Stenson might repeat his Open victory at Royal Troon when he edged in front due to a Rose bogey at the 13th, but he handed back the initiative to the Englishman when he bogeyed the 14th and Rose knocked in an eight-footer for birdie on the 15th.
Despite both men missing the green at the last, it was Stenson who blinked first, hitting a weak chip to 25 feet while Rose struck a deft chip close to the hole for a cast-iron birdie four.
Stenson recognised the quality of the golf on display on the final day and admitted: “When you're in good position to try and win, you always kind of feel a little disappointed afterwards.  But at the same time, we said that all along in the Olympics, you've got some pretty good consolation prizes.
“I guess if you would have asked me before the week that I would leave here with a medal, I would have been pretty pleased and I managed to do that.  I'm quite happy, I didn't feel like I played my absolute best throughout the week but I played good enough to put myself in contention and that was my goal.  Once I was up there, I played pretty well but I needed to play one or two shots better to win it today. “
Rose paid tribute to his rival and friend by saying: “I just said today that I had to out‑Stenson Stenson.  I knew I wasn't going to get much from him at all.  Obviously the bogey at the last only came because he had to force the putt in.
“But he is unbelievable.  He's relentless and a great player, and I can't wait to be on the same team as him in The Ryder Cup.  He's a great player and he's a great friend, and I just gave him a hug on the 18th green and he was as gracious as ever. I just said to him, ‘Great summer - winning The Open Championship’, I was so pleased for him.  There are very few guys are you really genuinely, genuinely happy for, and Henrik is one of them.”
Bronze medalist Kuchar just came up short, despite equaling the record 63 set by Australian Marcus Fraser on Thursday. Had he not three putted the 16th and failed to birdie the 18th, he might just have grabbed another colour of medal.
The American Ryder Cup player said: “It's just an amazing week. It’s a boyhood dream come true. I keep expressing the feeling of sheer pride.  I knew when I was out there playing that I was in third place.  I certainly didn't want to lose that but also wanted to keep pushing forward.
“While I was out there, playing that back nine, the sense of being an Olympic medalist really hit me.  There were times I kind of had to back off a few times and regather my thoughts and composure to make sure I try to continue to hit good shots and keep making birdies.”
Quotes of the Day

JUSTIN ROSE:  “I think it sits alongside the US Open trophy for me, for sure.  I think people want to keep comparing the two, major championship or Olympic gold, I don't think they should be compared to one another.  I said earlier this year that if my resumé one day read "multiple major champion and Olympic gold medalist," I would be a very, very happy man.  Just going to tag on another major now.”
HENRIK STENSON: “You play for your country and I think I did that pretty well today.  It was always going to be a battle ‑‑ or I was hoping it was going to be a battle with me and Justin for the gold and the silver, and it was in the end.  I think we both pleased to be a couple of shots ahead of Matt there coming into the last couple of holes, and it was down to the last hole and Justin just swung that a little bit quicker than me up the 18th (laughs).”
MATT KUCHAR: “I grew up a fan of sport.  I had the dreams most boys have of hoping to compete in an Olympics, hoping to win a medal.  The sport I ended up choosing was the sport that through my lifetime has not been an Olympic sport.  When it did become an Olympic sport, the lights went off and said, how amazing, I can't believe I now potentially have the opportunity.”
JUSTIN ROSE: (on using a picture of Michael Phelps for motivation) “I think the picture sort of circulated on social media a little bit.  I think Michael Phelps is literally just doing his stroke, eyes forward, and then there's a guy to his right kind of looking at him.  You know, part of our mentality was just to keep our eyes forward and play as hard as we could and take care of our business.  That's what Henrik does so well.  I knew that would be a strategy that wouldn't necessarily give me an advantage today but it would kind of ‑ it was something that was going to be very, very useful.  It was a nice, powerful image on which to work off.”
HENRIK STENSON: (comparing Olympic atmosphere to a major championship) “It is slightly different and I don't think you necessarily need to compare, either.  It's a whole new experience for us as golfers, participating here, and it's been a fun one.  I'm really happy I went.  It's memories of a lifetime being here competing, and we're competing for our countries more than we do normally in a way.  Yeah, it's been a nice ten days in Brazil.”
MATT KUCHAR: “To look at the support that was out here, to look at the guys that came through, won medals, I think it speaks for itself.  This event has gone over I think fantastically well.  Amazing support from the crowds.  I wasn't really sure what to expect as far as golf in Brazil.  I didn't think that it would have great support and it really did. If you take the broadcast and then look at what a great showdown to have these two guys battling down the end.  I don't know that it could have gone much better for the game.  It's a clear winner to move forward.”